The Ghana Music Rights Organisation (GHAMRO) in Collaboration with the Copyright Office on Tuesday organized a sensitization workshop for broadcasters with a call on stakeholders to contribute their quota to the development of the music industry.

The forum was aimed at education the broadcasters on licensing and royalties in remunerating rights owners to enhance the development of the music industry.

The Chairman of GHAMRO, Kojo Antwi called for a cordial atmosphere between rights owners and users to help Ghanaian music to thrive both locally and internationally.

The Maestro made these remarks when addressing members of the media fraternity on the role of broadcasting in the development of the Ghana music industry, at the Airport West Hotel in Accra.

- See more at: http://nydjlive.com/58728/ghamro-engages-broadcasters-in-a-sensitization-workshop-on-licensing-and-royalties/#sthash.sdPTfiKc.dpuf
GHAMRO engages broadcasters in a sensitization workshop on Licensing and Royalties - See more at: http://nydjlive.com/58728/ghamro-engages-broadcasters-in-a-sensitization-workshop-on-licensing-and-royalties/#sthash.sdPTfiKc.dpuf

GHAMRO TAKES NEW STEP TO COLLECT ROYALTIES FROM MEDIA ORGANIZATION.

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“If you intend to use music or cause a music to be used in public you have to pay or apply to GHAMRO for a license to use the work,” he said. Radio and television amounts to 50 per cent of total revenue generated in the copyright industry. The tariffs will be charged on the number of hours the media organization plays the music. Signature tunes and commercials will all attract the royalty payment. “Once you take a license from GHAMRO, you are covered from anybody who may come to you and say you are using my work without a license,”

Mr. Kudjoe said.GHAMRO is engaging the media in a two part sensitization workshop in Kumasi and Accra to intensify the collection of music royalties. Chairman of GHAMRO, Kwadwo Antwi, explains because the media as an institution that uses music, hence the need for the engagement. The Board has been in office for just about eight months but has increased the payment of royalties to deserving musicians. “Radio stations for years have been reaping the rights of musicians because you play our songs and don’t pay,” he said.

The workshop was organized by the Copyright Office, the Ministry of Justice and GHAMRO. It serves as part of efforts in educating broadcasting stations on the new copyright ACT 2005, ACT 690 and the accompanying regulation, LI 1962 of 2010. Meanwhile, the Maestro as he is affectionately called expressed worry at manner radio presenters select their songs for radio programs. “Presenters are presenting like in the clubs, if your music do not mix with the next music, then your song is not good,” Kojo said. “The trend we are going is dangerous”.

See more at: http://www.myjoyonline.com/news/2015/September-18th/ghamro-takes-new-steps-to-collect-royalties-from-media-organizations.php#sthash.C3DgudQe.dpuf



Nca Meets With Attorney General And GHAMRO Officials.

The National Communications Authority (NCA), played host to a visit by the Attorney General and officials of the Ghana Music Rights Organisation (GHAMRO) to the Authority’s offices. Mrs. Marietta Appiah Oppong, Attorney General and Minister for Justice who led the delegation, said she was happy with NCA’s willingness to meet with them. She was accompanied by Madam Yaa Attafuah, Head of the Copyright Office. From GHAMRO, were Mr. Kojo Antwi, who is the Management Board Chairman and other officials. The National Communications Authority (NCA), played host to a visit by the Attorney General and officials of the Ghana Music Rights Organisation (GHAMRO) to the Authority’s offices.Mrs. Marietta Appiah Oppong, Attorney General and Minister for Justice who led the delegation, said she was happy with NCA’s willingness to meet with them. She was accompanied by Madam Yaa Attafuah, Head of the Copyright Office. From GHAMRO, were Mr. Kojo Antwi, who is the Management Board Chairman and other officials.Receiving the delegation, Mr. Eugene Baffoe-Bonnie, Board Chairman of the NCA, said that the NCA’s doors were always open. With him were Mr. William Tevie, Ag. Director General and other Management members. The meeting discussed issues of mutual importance and benefits.

See more at:

http://www.nca.org.gh/73/34/News.html?item=519



 GHAMRO PARTNERS WITH WORLD INTERLLECTUAL PROPERTY FOR A WORKSHOP TO UMPROVE THEIR MANAGERIAL SKILLS

KOJOA

As part of measures by the new executives led by ace music gem, Kojo Antwi  to reshape and strengthen the activities of the Ghana Music Right Organisation, (GHAMRO), to the benefit of right owners, they have partnered an international firm, World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO)  for a workshop improve their managerial skills.

This was as a result of an agreement between GHAMRO and WIPO to send a special training mission to Ghana to assist GHAMRO officials develop and train its staff for the challenging  task ahead.

The team would be led by Mr Leon Van Wyk, a special consultant with WIPO.

The week long workshop, which commences today, thus Monday,  August 10 and ends on Friday, 14, would be aimed at  revising and establishing  of new regimes and systems for Licensing, documentation and distribution.

There would be a meeting with the Board and management of GHAMRO, where good governance, best practices and general policy will be discussed.

The move is in line with GHAMRO’s two-year development plan, set by the new executives.

WIPO, with the level of confidence reposed in the new managers of the organization had earlier sent an IT consultant in the person of Mr. Boukary Sawadogo  to GHAMRO in  installing and training staff on the new software to enhance the execution of the responsibility.

The initiative has provided GHAMRO with an effective and efficient database system to handle its documentation.

In this regard, GHAMRO has managed to capture particulars of about 2,700 members, updated the profile of 1,057 of about 3,746 that were in the list of register as members.

GHAMRO has also  captured about 10,775 works of its members into the WIPOCOS system, developing a tariff structure  for the various music uses such as broadcasting, live performances, hotels, restaurants, night clubs, shopping malls, banks, stores, drinking spots, offices, etc.

 see more at: http://yfmghana.com/entertainment/ghamro-partners-with-world-intellectual-property-organization-for-a-workshop-to-improve-their-managerial-skills

The Ghana Music Rights Organization (GHAMRO) is dialoguing with media organizations to pay musical royalties.

Under the exercise, media organizations must apply for a license to enable them use music on their networks.

The license which will last for a year will attract sanctions if not renewed two months after it expires.

The Copyright Law ( 2005, ACT 690) stipulates that such a person can be convicted to spend a period not less than six months or pay a fine of not less than 500 penalty units-a penalty unit is 12 Ghana Cedis.

The move is part of measures to strengthen the economic power of musicians and sustain creativity in the music industry.

Legal Administrator for GHAMRO, Jonathan Kudjoe says broadcasting stations must regularize their use of music for both local and foreign artists.

“If you intend to use music or cause a music to be used in public you have to pay or apply to GHAMRO for a license to use the work,” he said.

Radio and television amounts to 50 per cent of total revenue generated in the copyright industry.

The tariffs will be charged on the number of hours the media organization plays the music.

Signature tunes and commercials will all attract the royalty payment.

“Once you take a license from GHAMRO, you are covered from anybody who may come to you and say you are using my work without a license,” Mr. Kudjoe said.

GHAMRO is engaging the media in a two part sensitization workshop in Kumasi and Accra to intensify the collection of music royalties.

Chairman of GHAMRO, Kwadwo Antwi, explains because the media as an institution that uses music, hence the need for the engagement.

The Board has been in office for just about eight months but has increased the payment of royalties to deserving musicians.

“Radio stations for years have been reaping the rights of musicians because you play our songs and don’t pay,” he said.

The workshop was organized by the Copyright Office, the Ministry of Justice and GHAMRO.

It serves as part of efforts in educating broadcasting stations on the new copyright ACT 2005, ACT 690 and the accompanying regulation, LI 1962 of 2010.

Meanwhile, the Maestro as he is affectionately called expressed worry at manner radio presenters select their songs for radio programs.

“Presenters are presenting like in the clubs, if your music do not mix with the next music, then your song is not good,” Kojo said. “The trend we are going is dangerous”.

- See more at: http://www.myjoyonline.com/news/2015/September-18th/ghamro-takes-new-steps-to-collect-royalties-from-media-organizations.php#sthash.C3DgudQe.dpuf

The Ghana Music Rights Organization (GHAMRO) is dialoguing with media organizations to pay musical royalties.

Under the exercise, media organizations must apply for a license to enable them use music on their networks.

The license which will last for a year will attract sanctions if not renewed two months after it expires.

The Copyright Law ( 2005, ACT 690) stipulates that such a person can be convicted to spend a period not less than six months or pay a fine of not less than 500 penalty units-a penalty unit is 12 Ghana Cedis.

The move is part of measures to strengthen the economic power of musicians and sustain creativity in the music industry.

Legal Administrator for GHAMRO, Jonathan Kudjoe says broadcasting stations must regularize their use of music for both local and foreign artists.

“If you intend to use music or cause a music to be used in public you have to pay or apply to GHAMRO for a license to use the work,” he said.

Radio and television amounts to 50 per cent of total revenue generated in the copyright industry.

The tariffs will be charged on the number of hours the media organization plays the music.

Signature tunes and commercials will all attract the royalty payment.

“Once you take a license from GHAMRO, you are covered from anybody who may come to you and say you are using my work without a license,” Mr. Kudjoe said.

GHAMRO is engaging the media in a two part sensitization workshop in Kumasi and Accra to intensify the collection of music royalties.

Chairman of GHAMRO, Kwadwo Antwi, explains because the media as an institution that uses music, hence the need for the engagement.

The Board has been in office for just about eight months but has increased the payment of royalties to deserving musicians.

“Radio stations for years have been reaping the rights of musicians because you play our songs and don’t pay,” he said.

The workshop was organized by the Copyright Office, the Ministry of Justice and GHAMRO.

It serves as part of efforts in educating broadcasting stations on the new copyright ACT 2005, ACT 690 and the accompanying regulation, LI 1962 of 2010.

Meanwhile, the Maestro as he is affectionately called expressed worry at manner radio presenters select their songs for radio programs.

“Presenters are presenting like in the clubs, if your music do not mix with the next music, then your song is not good,” Kojo said. “The trend we are going is dangerous”.

- See more at: http://www.myjoyonline.com/news/2015/September-18th/ghamro-takes-new-steps-to-collect-royalties-from-media-organizations.php#sthash.C3DgudQe.dpuf
- See more at: http://www.myjoyonline.com/news/2015/September-18th/ghamro-takes-new-steps-to-collect-royalties-from-media-organizations.php#sthash.C3DgudQe.dpuf
- See more at: http://www.myjoyonline.com/news/2015/September-18th/ghamro-takes-new-steps-to-collect-royalties-from-media-organizations.php#sthash.C3DgudQe.dpuf

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